Joe Abou-Khaled: 'Dubai Lynx is a celebration of Arab advertising'
Posted on April 14, 2019

Joe Abou-Khaled, Regional Creative Director, IMPACT BBDO MENA shares his take on Dubai Lynx 2019 edition.

How would you evaluate this year's creativity? And what does it tell you about the regional industry?
Dubai Lynx opens the season for award competitions every year and sets the region’s benchmark for creativity. This year witnessed a wide participation from the big players who entered their fresh work. Contrary to last year, there has been a Grand Prix awarded in every single category this year, which clearly sends a positive message about the standard of the work, with BBDO alone winning eight of the these.


Is there a trend that characterizes the majority of the awarded work?  
Human engagement platforms, be it social or on-ground, are clearly taking over traditional communication forms.


Were the final results up to your expectations? Do you have any comments regarding the Grand Prix awarded?
There will always be unanswered questions about why this campaign made it and why this one didn’t. But that is also part of the game.
Each jury panel has its own dynamic and I don’t have a choice but to respect their final judgement.


Would you be able to name a campaign or two that you think deserved greater recognition?
Doesn’t matter at this stage. The upcoming award shows will surely dictate the weight of each entry.

Last I checked, Turkey and Pakistan were part of the Middle East region. Probably this is frustrating to companies that don’t have executive power in these countries.
 

Some of the comments we heard were related to having Turkey and Pakistan included in what is supposed to be a strictly Pan-Arab awards. What's your take on this?
Dubai Lynx is not by any means a celebration of Arab advertising; it is a festival that recognizes creativity in the Middle East. Last I checked, Turkey and Pakistan were part of the Middle East region. Probably this is frustrating to companies that don’t have executive power in these countries, but in all cases, I believe that the organizers need to be more precise and clear about the geography of our ever-growing territorial offering.


Other comments that emerged from the post-event discussions is that the work submitted this year wasn't really outstanding and don't stand a chance in the upcoming international awards. Do you agree with this?
The MENA region in the previous years always had its share in international competitions and it will keep on doing so. Still the conversion rate to metal is low, and this year will not make a big exception in my humble opinion.